February 26, 2016 at 12:30pm - 2:30pm

A conversation about the place of place for built environment professionals, and the connection between placemaking and the making/s of a professional. Contemplating what might constitute transformation - beyond current convention... a more evolved professionalism for our times.  

Ian Wight will offer some integrally-informed perspectives on his several decades of experience as a practitioner and educator - in the form of reflections on what it might mean to 'come home' professionally... in hopes of sparking observations and insights from attendees. An opportunity for some reflective practice together, some tacit knowledge sharing. 

Bio: A Canadian of Scottish descent, Ian is now a Senior Scholar, in City Planning, Faculty of Architecture, University of Manitoba - where he was a professor from 1994 to 2014, serving as Head of the City Planning program from 2003 to 2008. He now resides near Victoria, BC but is currently in Scotland exploring a noticed 'yearning for a Scottish life again', which would mean 'coming home' to his primal place . 

Involved in professional planning for 35 years, as both a practitioner and educator, Ian advocates for planning as placemaking, as wellbeing by design. His current action inquiry is around 'evolving professionalism - beyond the status quo', in the context of ‘contemplating the education of the agents of the next enlightenment’. This includes integrally-informed professional-self design – meshing the personal, the professional... and more besides - in support of transformational professional learning.

Register for tickets here

WHEN
Friday, 26 February 2016 from 12:30 to 14:30 (GMT) - Add to Calendar
WHERE
University of Dundee - River Rooms 2, Tower Building. Perth Road. Dundee DD1 4HN GB - View Map
WHEN
February 26, 2016 at 12:30pm - 2:30pm
WHERE
University of Dundee
River Rooms 2
Tower Building
Perth Road
Dundee DD1 4HN
United Kingdom
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